Can Sulforaphane Chemical in Sprouts, Broccoli Help in Treating ASD?

Ruby Joseph ByRuby Joseph

Can Sulforaphane Chemical in Sprouts, Broccoli Help in Treating ASD?

Sulforaphane, a chemical present in vegetables and broccoli, in particular, has shown promising signs in helping to improve few behavioral symptoms of the autism disorder.

Autism Broccoli

These results are seen to be the result of a small clinical trial that was successfully led by a team of researchers from the John Hopkins University, Baltimore.

Autism can be expanded as a developmental disorder that is characterized by complexities in emotional, communicative and social skills of an individual resulting in monotonous behaviors. The disorder is seen to trigger before 36 months of a child’s age and is seen to be occurring more in boys in comparison to girls.

As per the data available with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, autism-related disorders are seen to be the fastest growing developmental disabilities in the USA  with 1 in every 68 children being diagnosed with autism.

It should be noted that autism condition is incurable and tends to remain throughout the life of an individual in question. Nevertheless, by opting for the right therapies the symptoms can be reduced to help autistic people integrate into the society.

During the course of the study, researchers have found Sulforaphane to help reduce some behavioral symptoms to a certain extent by targeting the cellular complexities that are present in an individual diagnosed on the spectrum.

Loading

Sulforaphane: A chemical to help boost heat-shock responses in the body

It is a chemical seen to be present in varieties of vegetables and is seen in broccoli sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage.

Sulforaphane chemical is commonly known for its unique cancer-fighting properties.

Doctor Paul Talalay and his team discovered the amazing properties of Sulforaphane in the early nineties. The team discovered the unique behaviors of the chemical that helps one in boosting their body’s defense against aiding in DNA damage, inflammations, and oxidative stresses.

Doctor Talalay explains, “Many of my patients used to recall their child’s behavior significantly improving whenever they had a fever. This made us rethink about Sulforaphane being a heat-shock response treatment.”

The team further enrolled a batch of 40 participants comprising of young adolescents and men aged between 13 to 27 years.

It should be noted that the group of participants had varying symptoms of autism, from moderate to severe.

26 participants were assigned a Sulforaphane dose randomly. The dose varied between 9 to 27 Mg depending on the participant’s weight.

Sulforaphane, extracted from the broccoli sprout, was administered on a daily basis to the above 26 participants. The rest 14 were given a placebo dose on a similar frequency.

The team explains, neither their families nor the participants and the team who was performing the study was made aware of the treatment each subject was being administered.

During the course of subsequent weeks, varying number of ASD-related behavior parameters were measured and analyzed. Treatment was carried for a duration of 18 weeks.

Noticeable behavioral improvements were seen in some participants who were administered Sulforaphane.

However, the researchers also stress about a third of the participants did not show any behavioral improvements despite Sulforaphane being administered.

Thus the team highlights the importance of having the compound tested on a larger batch of participants to understand the underlying effects of Sulforaphane.

Summary
Can Sulforaphane Chemical in Sprouts, Broccoli Help in Treating ASD?
Article Name
Can Sulforaphane Chemical in Sprouts, Broccoli Help in Treating ASD?
Description
An insightful News Piece explaining the benefits of Sulforaphane.
Author
Publisher Name
Times of Autism
Publisher Logo
The following two tabs change content below.
Ruby Joseph

Ruby Joseph

Hi, my name is Ruby Joseph and I am Editor in Chief @ Autism Times. Every piece of article written and published on the site has to go through my desk before it reaches you. Wondering why? Because no one other than the one who has an autism diagnosis can understand others who have autism. I am an autistic and happy to be associated with one of the best leading autism platforms today.

About the author

Ruby Joseph

Ruby Joseph editor

Hi, my name is Ruby Joseph and I am Editor in Chief @ Autism Times. Every piece of article written and published on the site has to go through my desk before it reaches you.

Wondering why?

Because no one other than the one who has an autism diagnosis can understand others who have autism.

I am an autistic and happy to be associated with one of the best leading autism platforms today.

Leave a Reply